Model 100-200

Spray pattern: circular hollow-cone

Spray angle:
15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 70°, 78°, 90°, 120°
with bore holes of 0.1–0.2 mm: available only with the normal scatter cone

Orifices: 0.3 mm – 60 mm
Capacity: 0.03 – 1400 l/min at 3 bar

Applications

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For demanding applications 
High capacity and constant spray pattern 

  • Designed for critical and extremely critical pressure relationships
  • Maximum reproducibility
  • Extremely easy installation/de-installation
  • Very wide range of applications

SCHLICK hollow-cone nozzles atomise pressurised liquids into very fine droplets and thereby provide a large specific surface. The normal spray angle is achieved by bore diameters of

0.1 – 0.5 mm approx. 60°

0.5 – 1.6 mm approx. 70°

1.6 – 20 mm approx. 78°

from 21 mm approx. 80° – 85°

For spray angles smaller or larger than the normal spray angle the nozzle is fitted with a smaller or larger exit hole than that shown in the table. Each air flow rate corresponds to the nominal bore hole. In the same way, the total height of the nozzle can change. A differential pressure at 3 bar is chosen for testing and nominal pressure.

Even hollow cone even with fluctuating liquid pressure
The quality of the atomised spray and the droplet spectrum are related to the diameter of the hole, the pressure, the scatter cone, the density, the viscosity, and the surface tension. 

Minimum atomising pressure
0.1 – 0.5 mm Ø: differential pressure = 3 – 6 bar
0.5 – 1.6 mm Ø: differential pressure = 0.5 bar
ab 1.6 mm Ø: differential pressure = 0.1 – 0.5 bar

Droplet size with the same bore hole size
higher pressure = smaller droplets
lower pressure = larger droplets

Droplet size with the same pressure
larger bore hole = larger droplets
smaller bore hole = smaller droplets
dT ~ Ø

Droplet size with the same bore hole size and the same pressure
larger spray angle = smaller droplets
smaller spray angle = larger droplets
dT ~ 1/spray angle

Liquids with higher viscosities and surface areas must be tested for their atomisation with hollow cone nozzles. Compared to water, the fineness of the atomisation is generally coarser.

Materials: Acid resistant stainless steel, heat resistant stainless steel, brass, hastelloy, inconel, PP, PTFE, PVC, PVDF, RCH 1000, tantalum, titanium, other materials available on request.

Professional Cleaning and Service

Publications

  • Energy Efficiency:

    Finaly Atomised – Efficient cooling of process gases

    In a multitude of industrial fields, such as paper mills, glassworks, cement works, power plants, steel works, waste incineration, etc., cooling process gases in an economical and above all energy efficient way is becoming increasingly important. Evaporative cooling is the most effective way to cool and condition exhaust gases. By cooling the gases, a defined reduction in volume is achieved.

    Read more
  • Brilliant Droplets

    Nozzles and injection lances in use with flue gas denitrogenation installations

    The SNCR and SCR procedures were developed for flue gas denitrogenation in order to meet the strict air purification requirements. Injection lances for the defined insertion of the reducing agent are an important component of both processes. These differ in their structural and procedural design depending on the application.

    Read more
  • In fine vapors

    Atomisation technology in nitrogen oxide reduction using urea

    During flue gas denitrogenation, the addition of a reducing agent is used to transform nitrogen oxides into a substance that can be emitted without causing any damage or can be used again. The reducing agent ammonia is increasingly being replaced by innocuous urea. However, urea has a tendency to crystallise during atomisation. When observing the nozzle systems used in urea atomisation, it can be seen that trouble-free operation is not always guaranteed.

    Read more
  • A question of distribution

    Superheated steam cooling in industrial use

    Due to poor or incomplete combustion of the medium, soot is produced, and at the same time the emission values in the combustion chamber increase. With liquid fuels, combustion al­ways takes place in the gas phase: The liquid fuel is first atomised, then vaporised, mixed with air, and finally burned in the gas phase. This article shows how atomisation can be influenced by various special nozzles.

    Read more
  • And it burns

    Nozzle systems used in combustion processes

    Due to poor or incomplete combustion of the medium, soot is produced, and at the same time the emission values in the combustion chamber increase. With liquid fuels, combustion al­ways takes place in the gas phase: The liquid fuel is first atomised, then vaporised, mixed with air, and finally burned in the gas phase. This article shows how atomisation can be influenced by various special nozzles ...

    Read more

Your application, our nozzle.
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Consultation, engineering, production and testing
At SCHLICK, you get everything from one source.
The ideal solution for your application.

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Phone +49 9565 9481-0
Mail info(at)myschlick.com