Model 121

Spray pattern: circular hollow-cone
Spray angle: 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 78°, 90°, 120°
Orifices: 0.1 mm – 2.5 mm
Capacity: 0.014 – 3.4 l/min at 6 bar

Model 123

Spray pattern: circular hollow-cone
Spray angle: 30°, 45°, 60°, 78°, 90°, 120°
Orifices: 0.5 mm – 3.2 mm
Capacity: 0.1 – 4 l/min at 3 bar

Applications

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Precision even with the smallest qualities 
SCHLICK centrifugal mist nozzles series 121-123 

  • Very fine atomisation even with the lowest air flow rates
  • Blockage-resistant design with an integrated filter
  • Design with head screw threads for perfect and uncomplicated fitting
  • Extremely easy installation/de-installation
  • Very wide range of applications

Kreisl-spray nozzles are three-part nozzles consisting of a nozzle head, swirl unit and a screw fitting. The liquid flows tangentially into a swirl chamber and thereby starts to rotate. The energy in the pressurised liquid is converted into rotational energy or kinetic energy. A rotating film of liquid forms around an air core and emerges through the hole as a hollow cone. At the exit of the nozzle the liquid film encounters the surrounding air in a reciprocal reaction and breaks-up into fine droplets. These move away from the nozzle in an axial and radial direction and form a hollow cone. 

The quality of the atomised spray and the droplet spectrum are related to the diameter of the hole, the pressure, the scatter cone, the density, the viscosity, and the surface tension.

The normal spray cone is achieved by bore holes diameters of
0.1 – 0.5 mm approx. 60°
0.6 – 1.6 mm approx. 70°
1.7 – 2.5 mm approx. 78°

Custom spray cone with 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90° and 120° available. With bore holes of 0.1 to 0.25 mm only normal spray cone available.

Materials: Acid resistant stainless steel, heat resistant stainless steel, brass, hastelloy, inconel, platinum-iridium, PP, PTFE, PVC, PVDF, RCH 1000, tantalum, titanium, other materials available on request.

Professional Cleaning and Service

Product videos

Forms

Publications

  • Energy Efficiency:

    Finaly Atomised – Efficient cooling of process gases

    In a multitude of industrial fields, such as paper mills, glassworks, cement works, power plants, steel works, waste incineration, etc., cooling process gases in an economical and above all energy efficient way is becoming increasingly important. Evaporative cooling is the most effective way to cool and condition exhaust gases. By cooling the gases, a defined reduction in volume is achieved.

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  • Brilliant Droplets

    Nozzles and injection lances in use with flue gas denitrogenation installations

    The SNCR and SCR procedures were developed for flue gas denitrogenation in order to meet the strict air purification requirements. Injection lances for the defined insertion of the reducing agent are an important component of both processes. These differ in their structural and procedural design depending on the application.

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  • In fine vapors

    Atomisation technology in nitrogen oxide reduction using urea

    During flue gas denitrogenation, the addition of a reducing agent is used to transform nitrogen oxides into a substance that can be emitted without causing any damage or can be used again. The reducing agent ammonia is increasingly being replaced by innocuous urea. However, urea has a tendency to crystallise during atomisation. When observing the nozzle systems used in urea atomisation, it can be seen that trouble-free operation is not always guaranteed.

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  • A question of distribution

    Superheated steam cooling in industrial use

    Due to poor or incomplete combustion of the medium, soot is produced, and at the same time the emission values in the combustion chamber increase. With liquid fuels, combustion al­ways takes place in the gas phase: The liquid fuel is first atomised, then vaporised, mixed with air, and finally burned in the gas phase. This article shows how atomisation can be influenced by various special nozzles.

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  • And it burns

    Nozzle systems used in combustion processes

    Due to poor or incomplete combustion of the medium, soot is produced, and at the same time the emission values in the combustion chamber increase. With liquid fuels, combustion al­ways takes place in the gas phase: The liquid fuel is first atomised, then vaporised, mixed with air, and finally burned in the gas phase. This article shows how atomisation can be influenced by various special nozzles ...

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